Apple Inc.
Image Credit:   Apple Inc.


Apple Inc.
Image Credit:   Apple Inc.


Introduced: January 1983
Terminated: January 1985

Logic Board
Processor:   68000
Processor Speed:   5 MHz
PMMU:   none
FPU:   none
Bus Speed:   5 MHz
Data Path:   16-bit
ROM Size:   16K
Level 1 Cache:   none
Level 2 Cache:   none
Expansion Slots:   3 Proprietary Lisa Slots
Battery:   Onboard


Byte, February 1983
Image Credit:   Byte, February 1983



Memory
RAM Type:   Lisa Cards
RAM Slots:   2
Min - Max RAM:   0.5 MB - 2 MB
Install in groups of:   1
RAM Sizes:   512K
Onboard RAM:   none


Byte, February 1983
Image Credit:   Byte, February 1983



Ports
ADB:   none
USB:   none
FireWire:   none
Video:   RCA
Floppy:   none
SCSI:   none
Geoports:   none
Ethernet:   none
Mic Type:   none
Other ports:   Parallel printer port, 2 x DB-9 serial ports, audio out (CVSD), DB-9 mouse port

Video
Standard VRAM:   none
Maximum VRAM:   none

Display Resolution:
  • 640 x 480, 1-bit
  • Screen size is 12-inch, 720 x 364, 608 x 431 with Screen Kit. The built-in monitor is black and white.


Byte, February 1983
Image Credit:   Byte, February 1983



Storage
Standard CD-ROM:   none
Internal Hard Drive:   none
External Hard Drive:   Apple ProFile Drive (5 MB - 10 MB)
Floppy Disk Drive:   2 x 860K Twiggy 5.25-inch drives


Byte, February 1983
Image Credit:   Byte, February 1983



Operating System
Addressing Modes:   24-bit
Original OS:   Lisa OS
Original Enabler:   none
AppleTalk Version:   Not Applicable


Byte, February 1983
Image Credit:   Byte, February 1983



Miscellaneous
Codename:   Lisa
Form Factor:   Lisa
Dimensions (Inches):   15.2 H x 18.7 W x 13.8 D
Average Weight (lbs):   48
Gestalt ID:   2
Original Price:   $9,995 US


Apple Inc.
Image Credit:   Apple Inc.




(Click) Apple Dealer Spec Sheets


Comments
The Lisa is Apple's forgotten gamble into the business market. It was released a year earlier than the Macintosh and was Apple's first computer with a graphical user interface (GUI). The Lisa was underpowered and overpriced. At $9,995, only large corporations could afford to purchase one. Apple had little experience in this market and had almost no chance of breaking IBM's dominance of the business world. Although the Lisa was a far more advanced computer than IBM could offer, its lack of software and interoperability with IBM-based networks made it a loser before it ever got started. The 5 MHz, 68000 chip was not up to the task of managing the complex GUI operating system. A famous insider joke at Apple went something like this: "Knock, Knock. Who's there? (a long, long pause) Lisa." The Lisa ended up as a dismal failure and Apple learned a lot from the experience as many of Lisa's technologies later found their way to the Macintosh.


Additional Lisa Information:

Lisa Print Ads

The Lisa, Apple's First GUI-Based Computer System

The Apple Lisa 2




(Click) Additional Lisa Images: